Christopher Pratt (cpratt) wrote,
Christopher Pratt
cpratt

It's never polite to say "I told you so"

... but what the fuck, sure, why not.

February 1, 2008 I donated money to Barack Obama's campaign for the first time. Sadly, gays berate me for backing a loser and "living in an ideological bubble." Oh, and they make fun of my desire to marry a veteran.

February 19, 2008 sees more gays talking about how Obama is "scarier" than all of the rest of the Democratic candidates. They also start talking about Tony Rezko, Rashid Khalidi, and William Ayers, which strikes me as ridiculous at the time.

February 26, 2008 sees me talking about how ridiculous the William Ayers talk is, this time in terms of a Clinton campaign manager. I say this: "What's more disappointing than anything is that Hillary Clinton is running a campaign where it's OK to say anything, do anything, insinuate anything in order to win." Eight months later, I could say the same about John McCain. It didn't work for Clinton and it sure as hell didn't work for McCain.

February 28, 2008 sees the gays upset that Obama's Web site thinking that gays are people, not "issues." Eight months later, he becomes the first President elect in history to mention gay people in his acceptance speech.

March 25, 2008 sees Dan complaining about Hillary lying about sniper fire in Bosnia and more crazy Hillary-lovin' gays complaining about Barack Obama. ***WHATEVER***

May 31, 2008: Obama's campaign staff send e-mail that says this:

This morning someone forwarded me an email sent by the arm of the Republican Party that raises money for their Senate candidates.

The subject of the message was "Democrats Win Landslide Victory," and the writer, Republican former Senator Bill Frist, admits: "I have a real fear of waking up to this headline after the elections this fall."

He goes on to explain fears among Washington power brokers about Barack Obama's grassroots support and voter registration efforts.

He's right to be worried -- we're bringing new people into the process, and Obama supporters are organizing in communities across the country like never before.

I married Dan in August. Thanks to friends and family, we raised over $3,000 to defeat Proposition 8.

By the time September rolled around, friends and family were panicking. Ian and my parents began fretting that he wasn't going to be able to win this. I said yes. Just don't panic, it's going to be fine. Wish I could find this one image from the Stranger from this time, but I can't.

A week later, I was talking about Barack Obama's inauguration. Two weeks later, I was talking to Malagasy children about my country, a country where even an ordinary child with a Kansan mother and a Kenyan father could work hard and realize the American dream: to make a change for the better in this world. To become President. I'm not sure anyone agreed.

Four weeks later, the polls had changed to show Barack Obama in the lead.

Four hours ago, John McCain conceded.

Know hope.

We're back on track. It's going to take years of hard work and sacrifice to right all of the wrongs that we've suffered over the last eight years, but we can do it. We have it in ourselves. We will succeed.
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